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I am young and healthy. Why do I need to know my family health history?

I am young and healthy. Why do I need to know my family health history?

  • 3/18/2019 6:30:00 AM
  • View Count 285
Ming Li, MSAngelina Jolie, an Oscar-winning actress, announced to have a surgery to remove her ovaries and fallopian tubes to reduce her risk of developing ovarian cancer in 2015. She has already undertook a preventative double mastectomy earlier. She made this difficult decision because she has a strong family health history (FHH) of ovarian cancer. FHH, a record of the diseases and health conditions in one’s family, plays a significant role in early disease detection and prevention. By f...
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Quantification of Proteolytic Pathways in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells

Quantification of Proteolytic Pathways in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells

  • 2/11/2019 6:30:00 AM
  • View Count 219
Jessica Cardin, PhDProtein degradation is a main component of the body to enable proper function and tissue maintenance. Certain types of cancer have demonstrated to have an enhanced ability to degrade malformed proteins through intracellular systems. The ability to break these proteins down has the potential to protect cancerous cells and allow them to proliferate. Specific degradation pathways have exhibited the capacity to alter the cell cycle, leading to tumors to increase in aggressiveness ...
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Breast Cancer Gene Expression: Learn to Walk Before You Can Run

Breast Cancer Gene Expression: Learn to Walk Before You Can Run

  • 12/3/2018 5:00:00 AM
  • View Count 4
Chelsea Goodenough, PhDFrom a young age, we are told “You have to learn to walk, before you can run.” Cell function is no different.Proteins dictate cell function, but what proteins are found in our cells are dictated by the messaging transcriptsthat code for their production. The amounts and types of those coding transcripts, known to scientists asmessenger RNA (mRNA), dictate protein levels and ultimately reflect cellular function. When the transcriptionrate of certain mRNA molecul...
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Are MicroRNA's the Connection Between Exercise and Breast Cancer?

Are MicroRNA's the Connection Between Exercise and Breast Cancer?

  • 3/5/2018 6:30:00 AM
  • View Count 647
Chelsea Goodenough, HBScBreast cancer is the most common type of cancer that kills women world-wide [1]. Emerging out from under the emotional and financial burden of this disease is the united front of patients, families and researchers alike seeking to understand the complexity of this disease. With exercise's noted benefit to a 30-40% reduction in breast cancer risk, investigation into mechanisms that may be attributing to these findings have unveiled a frontrunner - microRNA. MicroRNA ar...
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Think BIG, Start SMALL: MicroRNAs and Breast Cancer

Think BIG, Start SMALL: MicroRNAs and Breast Cancer

  • 12/4/2016 5:22:00 PM
  • View Count 3647
Chelsea Goodenough, B.S.The human body is capable of powerful things. When in prime condition, we are capable of adrenaline induced She-Hulk strength, and fighting the effect of zero gravity by walking on the moon. This, to most of us, is recognizable as disease, and is amongst us in the form of diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to name only a few. A disease that affects nearly 246,660 new people every year, is breast cancer, with an estimated 40,...
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Exercise Can Provide Protection In Extreme Situations

Exercise Can Provide Protection In Extreme Situations

  • 11/27/2016 6:09:00 PM
  • View Count 1301
Rihana Bokhari, B.S.You have probably heard before that exercise is good for you. You know that doctors recommend people in disease states exercise, for instance in diabetes and heart disease. But did you know that exercise can do far more than help you look good and feel great? Exercise may be able to protect you if you are exposed to radiation. Radiation is well known to have negative effects on the body and lead to illness and loss of life. In this study we seek to understand how exercise, an...
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 Does this world need more Angelina Jolies?

Does this world need more Angelina Jolies?

  • 6/19/2014 4:03:00 AM
  • View Count 2007
Divya Talwar, BDS, MPHIn late summer, 2013, Hollywood actress Angelina Jolie, accompanied by her partner Brad Pitt, revealed at a press conference that she underwent a preventive double mastectomy due to a “faulty gene”. The “faulty gene” that led to Jolie’s difficult decision was the BRCA1 gene, and the preventive procedure reduced the risk of breast cancer from 87% to just 5%. Jolie could have kept the decision private; instead, she chose to share this news with t...
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Understanding mTOR: Great for Muscle, Bad for Cancer

Understanding mTOR: Great for Muscle, Bad for Cancer

  • 6/18/2014 9:02:00 AM
  • View Count 6732
Kevin Shimkus, B.S.In muscle research, we tend to pay a great deal of attention to a particular signaling protein called mTOR, a key regulatory protein that signals for cell growth through the creation of new proteins. Consider protein building similar to a race car. The larger the engine, the greater potential for speed. Similarly, the more mTOR protein present in any given cell, the greater potential for more protein construction. And just like the gas pedal fuels the engine, mTOR is a signali...
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Vitamin D and Exercise

Vitamin D and Exercise

  • 10/17/2011 2:48:00 PM
  • View Count 7382
Nina Laidlaw Rumler, B.A.Headlines about vitamin D abound. Is it as good as they say? How does it impact exercise and athletes?Advocates claim a wide range of proven or implied benefits, such as: Improved physical performance Bone strengthening (rickets, osteoporosis, osteomalacia, gum/tooth diseases) Strengthening of the immune system –fewer colds, flu, pneumonia, allergies. Inhibition/prevention of hypertension, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, cancer, heart dis...
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A Little Fish Oil Could Go a Long Way

A Little Fish Oil Could Go a Long Way

  • 10/17/2011 2:38:00 PM
  • View Count 2854
 Justin Dobson, Ph.D(c), CSCS, SCCC   Inflammation is a natural response to stress put on the body. It is the first step in the body’s healing process, in which repair cells are directed from the blood into the injured tissue. Acute (short-lived) inflammation is necessary, but problems arise when inflammation persists (chronic inflammation). Besides rheumatoid arthritis or tendonitis, chronic inflammation accompanies many other disease states, such as atherosc...
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